*


Russian Potraits 1
2



Chekhov, Pondering

Imagine Chekhov, at some point during the last weeks of his life, pondering old photographs. Imagine the dying man pausing over this image of his younger self. Consider the writer's possible responses, the clashing combinations of memory, observation, obsolete opinions, the present knowledge as he looks at himself sitting -posing, yes, definitely posing for the camera-on the steps of his country home in Melikhovo, little Khiva tucked in the crook of his arm. Perhaps the older Chekhov would observe the younger Chekhov with irritated amusement. He might even wince at the pretensions suggested by the pose, since he is an expert critic of insincerity and has filled his fiction with misguided poseurs- lovers, industrialists, peasants and landowners-who treat the world as their showcase. See how the cane cuts neatly toward the center of the picture, the tips of his shoes gleam-these details might provoke him to think with some chagrin of the author who claimed to have ideas for 1036 stories, who was planning to write a novel "a hundred versts long," and who intended someday to visit Tahiti, Chicago and the Arctic. And yet the older Chekhov, I believe, would forgive his younger self. Always a man who valued modesty above publicity, and "good literary manners" above ambition, he shows us in his work that some form of pretension, even awkward pretension, is necessary to survive in a civilized society. When we lose interest in the theatrics of behavior, we are in danger of succumbing to pernicious boredom. At best we end up like Laevsky in "The Duel." At worst, we drift off with poor Andrei Yefimich in "Ward No.6," muttering to the end, "It's all the same to me ... I won't answer ... It's all the same." Or perhaps Chekhov would marvel at this man a decade younger than himself, grandson of serfs and at the age of thirty-seven already the author of such masterpieces as "The Steppe" and "Three Years." Perhaps he would wonder how he fulfilled all of the obligations that fell on him that decade, when he became caretaker for his parents and sister, when he served as the doctor for the local peasants and as squire of the village of Melikhovo and still managed to make the grueling trip across Siberia to the island of Sakhalin. He might recall his pattern of responsible moderation with more than a little pride, seeing in this portrait a man who devoted himself to the problems of others and yet could come close himself in his study for hours at a time, pick up his pen and hear the grass singing in his mind. It could be, though, that the dying Chekhov would neither wince nor marvel at this picture but turn away in despair, comprehending more fully than ever before his own dishonesty. Here is Dr. Chekhov, villain of self-deception. What did it matter that he suffered his first bout of blood-spitting in 1884, shortly after graduating from medical school? What did it matter that for thirteen years, though he treated many victims of tuberculosis, he refused to identify the symptoms in himself? The disease probably would have progressed at the same speed even had he sought treatment earlier. But the lack of acknowledgement is troubling. If he'd been one of his characters, his pose of health would have revealed itself as a lie, and he would have seemed pathetic in his stubborn effort to make a lasting name for himself. Of course, this Chekhov, the Chekhov lounging on the steps of his Melikhovo home, collar turned up just so, will be remembered: as the jaunty, brilliant writer, as the modest poseur and as a dying man unable to acknowledge his illness because the telling would have made death sensible. He preferred to tell of life.            

-Joanna Scott



*

Mikhail Bulgakov

This is the man who brought the Devil to Moscow. Born in Kiev in 1891, he graduated in medicine in 1916 and then specialized in the treatment of syphilis. Apparently he was not very good at it. A woman who had known him in his youth said: "What? Mishka Bulgakov- a famous writer? That incompetent venereologist- a famous Russian writer?" The germs of absurdity were even then present in the young Dr. Bulgakov. The leaky faucet in his consulting room often flooded out the people in the basement flat below. You can see it here, an antic spirit half-concealed behind the smug facade of a brisk, clever, successful young man. He was said to have a habit of pacing the room and tossing his hair back off his forehead, and to be caustic, ill-tempered and sarcastic. This too can be read in his features, in the steely penetration of that monocled eye, and the curl of those damply sensuous lips. They say his teeth were very strong.
    By 1923 he had abandoned the syphilitics and moved to Moscow, where he wrote for the theater. He enjoyed early fame, and perhaps it's this that lends the impression of a certain mannered arrogance, born, surely, of an awareness of the burgeoning powers of an imagination of glorious heft and muscle? But we are still a dozen years away from The Master and Margarita, and those years will see Mishka Bulgakov bee coming embittered by stringent censorship until, improbably, in the spring of 1932, Stalin himself telephones to tell him to go back to the Moscow Art Theater, all is forgiven.
    The Master was finished in 1938. Bulgakov went blind in 1939. In 1940 he died. What does the face look like then, that razory intelligence first scalded with impotent fury at the state's constriction of his art, and the fury then sublimated in a masterpiece of irony about a fabulous, satanic, transhistorical figure of utter omnipotence? This satanic figure is the Devil Bulgakov brings to Moscow to wreak havoc in the lives of little people; to liberate a master-writer from the madhouse and reunite him with his beloved; and then, with his wild and crazy retinue, to climb into the night sky on horseback and ride away, back to the abyss whence he came. It is Stalin.

- Patrick McGrath

Tay này đem Quỉ tới Hà Lội - ấy chết xin lỗi – Mút Ku. Sinh năm 1891, học y khoa, ra trường năm 1916, chuyên trị tim la. Có vẻ như ông đếch biết gì về bịnh này, hà hà! Một bà biết ông từ khi còn thanh niên, phán, “Cái gì? Mishka Bulgakov? Cái tên bác sĩ vô tài bất tướng, chẳng biết tí gì về giang mai, hột xoài mà là nhà văn Nga Xô nổi tiếng ư?
Ui chao, cái mầm bịnh khủng khiếp là tim la đó - nghe nói ngày xưa, do 1 tên vua Tẫu nhìn xác Tây Thi, thèm quá làm “bậy”, và truyền bịnh cho toàn thể nhân loại - biến thành mầm phi lý ở nơi vị bác sĩ trẻ.





*

Winter 1995: Một trong những số báo đầu tiên của GCC, April, 98. Trong có bài phỏng vấn Steiner. Bèn chơi liền!
Ba bài thơ của Simic, là tìm đọc sau đó.
Và "Chân Dung Nga", trong có bức hình Akhmatova.

Charles Simic

Against Winter

The truth is dark under your eyelids.
What are you going to do about it?
The birds are silent; there's no one to ask.
All day long you'll squint at the gray sky.
When the wind blows you'll shiver like straw. 

A meek little lamb you grew your wool
Till they came after you with huge shears
Flies hovered over your open mouth,
Then they, too, flew off like the leaves,
The bare branches reached after them in vain. 

Winter coming. Like the last heroic soldier
Of a defeated army, you'll stay at your post,
Head bared to the first snowflake.
Till a neighbor comes to yell at you,
You're crazier than the weather, Charlie.

The Paris Review, Issue 137,1995

Chống Đông

Sự thực thì mầu xám dưới mi mắt anh
Anh sẽ làm gì với nó?
Chim chóc nín thinh; không có ai để hỏi.
Suốt ngày dài anh lé xệch ngó bầu trời xám xịt
Và khi gió thổi, anh run như cọng rơm.

Con cừu nhỏ, anh vỗ béo bộ lông của anh
Cho tới bữa họ tới với những cây kéo to tổ bố
Ruồi vần vũ trên cái miệng há hốc của anh
Rồi chúng cũng bay đi như những chiếc lá
Cành cây trần trụi với theo nhưng vô ích.

Mùa Đông tới. Như tên lính anh dũng cuối cùng
Của một đạo quân bại trận, anh sẽ bám vị trí của anh
Đầu trần hướng về bông tuyết đầu tiên
Cho tới khi người hàng xóm tới la lớn:
Mi còn khùng hơn cả thời tiết, Charlie. (1)


*

Russian Portraits 

The portraits that follow are from a large number of photographs recently recovered from sealed archives in Moscow, some-rumor has it-from a cache in the bottom of an elevator shaft. Five of those that follow, Akhmatova, Chekhov (with dog), Nabokov, Pasternak (with book), and Tolstoy (on horseback) are from a volume entitled The Russian Century, published early last year by Random House. Seven photographs from that research, which were not incorporated in The Russian Century, are published here for the first time: Bulgakov, Bunin, Eisenstein (in a group with Pasternak and Mayakovski), Gorki, Mayakovski, Nabokov (with mother and sister), Tolstoy (with Chekhov), and Yesenin. The photographs of Andreyev, Babel, and Kharms were supplied by the writers who did the texts on them. The photograph of Dostoyevsky is from the Bettmann archives. Writers who were thought to have an especial affinity with particular Russian authors were asked to provide the accompanying texts. We are immensely in their debt for their cooperation.

The Paris Review Winter 1995 

Chân Dung Nga 

Những bức hình sau đây là từ một lố mới kiếm thấy, từ những hồ sơ có đóng mộc ở Moscow, một vài bức có giai thoại riêng, thí dụ, đã được giấu kỹ trong ống thông hơi ở tận đáy thang máy! Năm trong số, Akhmatova, Chekhov [với con chó], Nabokov, Pasternak (với sách), và Tolstoy (cưỡi ngựa), từ một cuốn có tên là Thế Kỷ Nga, xb cuối năm ngoái [1997], bởi Random House. Bẩy trong cuộc tìm kiếm đó không được đưa vô cuốn Thế Kỷ Nga, và được in ở đây, lần thứ nhất: Bulgakov, Bunin, Eisenstein (trong một nhóm với Pasternak and Mayakovski), Gorki, Mayakovski, Nabokov (với mẹ và chị/em) Tolstoy (với Chekhov), and Yesenin. Hình Andreyev, Babel, và Kharms, do những nhà văn kiếm ra cung cấp, kèm bài viết của họ về chúng. Hình Dostoyevsky, từ hồ sơ Bettmann. Những nhà văn nghe nói có giai thoại, hay mối thân quen kỳ tuyệt về những tác giả Nga, thì bèn được chúng tôi yêu cầu, viết đi, viết đi, và chúng tôi thực sự cám ơn họ về mối thịnh tình, và món nợ lớn này.
*

*

Khi tôi phỏng vấn Milan Kundera vào thập niên 80 ở Paris, ông nói, “Andreyev, một bạn cũ, thời niên thiếu. Nhà văn bự".
Và Pasternak, năm 1960 tại Peredelkino: “Thập niên 60, Nga, lù tù mù, như núi nhìn từ xa, khổng lồ. Tài văn của Andreyev thì cũng khổng lồ như thế, và theo thời gian, càng trở nên khổng lồ".
    Khổng lồ, nhưng vào thời kỳ đó, ông bị ém tài, nếu không muốn nói, bị đàn áp, ở nơi gọi là Liên Xô. Trong những lần thăm viếng, nếu tự nhận mình là cháu gái của ông, tôi được đón tiếp với sự sợ sệt - một nhà văn bị cấm, bất hợp pháp, yêu đất nước của mình bằng 1 thứ tình yêu mãnh liệt, nguy hiểm, đầy đam mê. Và chính là bằng cái cường độ tình yêu mãnh liệt như thế đó, ông đem đến, cho cái viết chính trị, văn chương, kịch nghệ, nhiếp ảnh, và cuộc đời.
    Trước những lần viếng thăm Moscow của tôi, khi xẩy ra Cuộc Chiến Lớn, nghĩa là xa xưa lắm rồi, khi Leonid Andreyev còn là 1 trong những nhà văn nổi tiếng nhất, ông đã nhìn ra những chương trình, kế hoạch ma quỉ của Lenin, cho tương lai. Ông tố cáo đám Bolshevik ăn cướp chính quyền, kêu gọi Đồng Minh can thiệp.
    Và rồi, vào năm 1919, ông mất ở Phần Lan, trong cô đơn, ghẻ lạnh, và biến mất khỏi ý thức, lương tâm văn học Nga trong vòng 50 năm.

Bây giờ, vào thập niên 90, ông lại được khám phá ra, ở Nga, những truyện của ông được xb, kịch được được dựng – hai, “hits”, ở Moscow, mùa này. Ekaterina là một “xăng xa xườn” – sensation, ấn tượng, xúc động (?), ở Luân Đôn, năm ngoái, câu chuyện một em Nga, trẻ, bị những đấng đàn ông trong đời em phản bội, chẳng khác gì lũ VC Liên Xô phản bội nhân dân của nó, trong Đệ Nhất Thế Chiến. Viên Tổng Trấn, là 1 truyện ngắn về cú ám sát một viên chức cao cấp của Nga Hoàng, bởi những người cách mạng chân chính, làm vọng lên không khí những ngày này ở Moscow, nơi quyền lực chính trị, và nỗi sợ khủng bố trả thù, thì không thể chia lìa.
Trong bức chân dung, Leonid Andreyev, cháu trai của một nông nô, với cái nhìn lạ thường, những tài năng đa tầng, có vẻ như đang nhìn về tương lai, và nhìn thấy nó, nhận ra nó: một vực thẳm.

Olga Carlisle

[Người được Solzhenitsyn tin cẩn, lén đem “Quần Đảo Gulag” qua Tây Phương]



Chân Dung Nga



*

Boris Pasternak

Pasternak's poems are like the flash of a strobe light-for an instant they reveal a corner of the universe not visible to the naked eye. I fell in love with these poems as a child. They were magical, fragments of the natural world captured in words that I did not always understand. Pasternak was my father's favorite poet. In the evenings he often recited his poems aloud, as did Marina Tsvetayeva, a friend of the family who often came to our house in those years before the war.
    Long afterwards, George Plimpton and Harold Humes  brought the live Pasternak into my life. A year or so after the resounding success of Doctor Zhivago, when the dust had begun to settle on the scandal of his being forced to give up the Nobel Prize, they sent me on a mission to Moscow to interview the poet for The Paris Review.
I'll never forget that sunny day at Peredelkino in the winter of 1959-1960, a few months before Pasternak died. The sparkling snow, the fir trees, the half torn note pinned to the door on the veranda at the side of the house: "I am working now. I cannot receive anybody. Please go away." On an impulse, thinking of the small gifts I was bringing the poet from admirers in the West, I did knock. The door opened.  
    Pasternak stood there, wearing an astrakhan hat. When I introduced myself he welcomed me cordially as my father's daughter- they had met in Berlin in the twenties. Pasternak's intonations were those of his poems. In an instant the warm, slightly nasal singsong voice assured me that my parents' country still existed and that it had a future as real as that sunny day. Today, no matter how harsh life in Russia is, that flash of feeling is proven true. Russia has survived, and the natural world around us which Pasternak celebrated is as wondrous as ever.
- Olga Carlisle

*

Người lén đem tác phẩm của Solz qua Tây phương

Đọc bài viết 1 phát, thì cái đầu óc bịnh hoạn của Gấu Cà Chớn lại hiện ra cái cảnh 1 nhà thơ hải ngoại, đi cùng, cũng 1 nhà thơ hải ngoại - bạn của GCC, nhưng còn là cựu sĩ quan VNCH, bỏ chạy kịp trước 30 Tháng Tư 1975, không có lấy 1 ngày cải tạo làm thưốc chữa bịnh lưu vong - bèn bò về, xin yết kiến nhà thơ HC, và 1 ông châm cái đóm, hầu thuốc lào nhà thơ số 1 Đất Bắc!

Và nhà thơ HC bèn an ủi hai nhà thơ hải ngoại, quê hương của chúng ta vưỡn còn!
Thơ Mít vưỡn còn!
Lá diêu bông cũng vưỡn còn, nhưng thuộc hàng chiến lược, hàng xuất khẩu quan trọng, qua xứ người nhiều rồi!

Notes About Brodsky
Milosz

Trong một tiểu luận, Brodsky gọi Mandelstam là một thi sĩ của văn hóa. Brodsky chính ông, cũng là 1 thi sĩ của văn hóa, và hẳn là vì lý do này, ông tạo sự hài hòa với dòng sâu thẳm của thế kỷ, trong đó con người, bị đe dọa mất mẹ cái giống người, khám phá ra quá khứ như là một mê cung chẳng hề có tận cùng. Lặn sâu vô mê cung, chúng ta khám phá ra cái gì sống sót quá khứ là kết quả của nguyên lý phân biệt dựa trên đẳng cấp. Mandelstam, ở trong Gulag, điên khùng bới đống rác tìm đồ ăn, [ui chao lại nhớ Giàng Búi], là thực tại về độc tài bạo chúa và sự băng hoại thoái hoá bị kết án phải tuyệt diệt. Mandelstam đọc thơ cho vài bạn tù là khoảnh khoắc thần tiên còn hoài hoài

Bài viết Sự quan trọng của Simone Weil cũng quá tuyệt.
Bài nào đọc cũng tuyệt, khiến Gấu tự hỏi, tại làm sao cũng CS, mà ở đó lại có những bậc như Brodsky, như Milosz, thí dụ.

Bắc Kít, chỉ có thứ nhà văn nhà thơ viết dưới ánh sáng của Đảng!

Cái vụ Tố Hữu khóc Stalin thảm thiết, phải mãi gần đây Gấu mới giải ra được, sau khi đọc một số bài viết của những Hoàng Cầm, Trần Dần, những tự thú, tự kiểm, sổ ghi sổ ghiếc, hồi ký Nguyễn Đăng Mạnh... Sự hèn nhát của sĩ phu Bắc Hà, không phải là trước Đảng, mà là trước cá nhân Tố Hữu. Cả xứ Bắc Kít bao nhiêu đời Tổng Bí Thư không có một tay nào xứng với Xì Ta Lin. Mà, Xì, như chúng ta biết, suốt đời mê văn chương, nhưng không có tài, tài văn cũng không, mà tài phê bình "như Thầy Cuốc", lại càng không, nên đành đóng vai ngự sử văn đàn, ban phán giải thưởng, ra ơn mưa móc đối với đám nhà văn, nhà thơ. Ngay cả cái sự thù ghét của ông, đối với những thiên tài văn học Nga như Osip Mandelstam, Anna Akhmatova… bây giờ Gấu cũng giải ra được, chỉ là vì những người này dám đối đầu với Stalin, không hề chịu khuất phục, hay "vấp ngã"!

Gấu tin là, Tố Hữu tự coi ông như là Xì của xứ Bắc Kít. Ông còn bảnh hơn cả Xì, vì là một thi sĩ thứ thực, nếu chúng ta đọc dòng thơ cách mạng hồi ông còn trẻ. Tất cả các văn nghệ sĩ Bắc Kít sở dĩ sợ Tố Hữu đến như thế, chính là vì với họ, Tố Hữu là…. Xì Ta Lin mũi tẹt, Bắc Kít!
[Trung nhưng biến thành Bắc Kít]


*

      

Vladimir Nabokov

Together they make a butterfly. Uncle Vasiliy Rukavishnikov and young Nabokov's mother serve as wings, and Vladimir himself is body and head. The boy's white shirt flows into his mother's sleeve, and the whiteness of his sock fuses with her skirts; beloved Uncle Ruka's knee (in nine years he'd be gone, angina pectoris) attaches to his nephew as he clasps him gently about waist, by wrist. The precocious lepidopterist has decided to cross his legs, and so their familial butterfly is swallow-tailed.

Although he hates his starched collar and Stresa (in Speak, Memory we hear about such matters), the shrewd sweetness in his face confirms his later assessment: "I probably had the happiest childhood imaginable."

And what of the butterfly effect? What of that theory he might not have known, but which he clearly anticipated? That when a butterfly flutters its wings in St. Petersburg, say, this movement will affect, in some minute but mathematically provable way, the weather in Ithaca, New York? Nabokov understood the intricate, utter connectedness of all particulars in nature-divine, human, beastly -with the precision of a scientist. He, among writers this century, was the greatest physicist of the human soul, assayer extraordinaire of its frailties and tensile strengths. Surely he recognized how Lolita's laughter was contiguous with Ada's postcoital giggles, surely knew how Van Veen's heavy breathing somehow carried through into the song of rhyming John Shade, when he invoked white butterflies turning lavender at dusk.

Back to the photograph. Squint and you'll see them set to fly-Elena a sumptuous ruffly lifter, with elbows cocked to take on air, Uncle Ruka supportive of the boy who readies himself to view his world, theirs and ours, from a universal vantage where once transparent things now are laughter in the light.

-Bradford Morrow


*

Vladimir Nabokov

One of the fallacies about becoming a writer is that, in order to do so, you have to suffer an unhappy childhood. Sometimes, the opposite is the case. As evidence, we have this photograph of Vladimir Nabokov, age eight. He sits on the porch at Vyra, the Nabokov summer home, studying a butterfly book and wearing a breathtaking pair of socks. As you can see, Vladimir was a rich kid. He came from an aristocratic family, had a father and a French governess. In 1917, the Russian Revolution ended all that. The boy you see here ceased to exist.

Or did he? Later, when he began to write in exile, Nabokov would draw again and again on the world of this photograph to derive his fiction. He would do so, however, not by writing about his lost Russia but by keeping in touch with the qualities of existence his childhood there had acquainted him with. Early on, Vladimir had discovered that he was synesthetic like his mother. For him, the color blue had a taste. Such doublings of consciousness marked his intellectual and aesthetic development. As a man, he set upon his writing with the attitude of the boy in this photograph: magisterially seated to peruse and dissect creation. The elegant wicker chair, the sprig of blossom in the windowsill, the fanciful summerhouse itself, these things accompanied the waking of Vladimir's sentient mind. Thereafter, his prose was full of their style and fragrance, if not their autobiographical presence.

All of Nabokov's novels reenact the discovery that the color blue has a taste.

Vladimir here is almost Lolita's age. His  connoisseur's eye and screened pelvis foretell Humbert Humbert. This was before exile, before Nabokov's own father was shot and killed- tragedies Vladimir would write about, for the most part, obliquely, preferring to make his books like the one here in his lap: a collection of shimmering creatures, delicately pinned, each, in its journey from worm to butterfly, demonstrating the extravagant imagination of nature.

-Jeffrey Eugenides

Một trong những quái đản về chuyện trở thành nhà văn, là phải có 1 tuổi thơ khốn nạn.
Trường hợp Nabokov là 1 chứng ngược chân lý cà chớn này.
Và tại sao mà Nabokov mê bướm đến như thế.
Ông chửi Cách Mạng Nga 1 câu thật thú, giả như không có Cách Mạng Nga, tớ vẫn ở Nga, vẫn mê bưóm, và đếch thèm viết văn.
Tớ là thằng bé có 1 tuổi thơ hạnh phúc nhất, không thể nào tưởng tượng ra được


*

 Russian Portraits

The portraits that follow are from a large number of photographs recently recovered from sealed archives in Moscow, some-rumor has it-from a cache in the bottom of an elevator shaft. Five of those that follow, Akhmatova, Chekhov (with dog), Nabokov, Pasternak (with book), and Tolstoy (on horseback) are from a volume entitled The Russian Century, published early last year by Random House. Seven photographs from that research, which were not incorporated in The Russian Century, are published here for the first time: Bulgakov, Bunin, Eisenstein (in a group with Pasternak and Mayakovski), Gorki, Mayakovski, Nabokov (with mother and sister), Tolstoy (with Chekhov), and Yesenin. The photographs of Andreyev, Babel, and Kharms were supplied by the writers who did the texts on them. The photograph of Dostoyevsky is from the Bettmann archives. Writers who were thought to have an especial affinity with particular Russian authors were asked to provide the accompanying texts. We are immensely in their debt for their cooperation.

The Paris Review
1995 Winter

 *

Daniil Kharms

Among the millions killed by Stalin was one of the funniest and most original writers of the century, Daniil Kharms. After his death in prison in 1942 at the age of thirty-seven, his name and his work almost disappeared, kept alive in typescript texts circulated among small groups of people in the then Soviet Union. Practically no English-speaking readers knew of him. I didn't, until I went to Russia and came back and read books about it and tried to learn the language. My teacher, a young woman who had been in the U.S. only a few months, asked me to translate a short piece by Daniil Kharms as a homework assignment. The piece, "Anecdotes from the Life of Pushkin," appears in CTAPYXA (Old Woman), a short collection of Kharms's work published in Moscow in 1991. Due to my newness to the language and the two dictionaries and grammar text I had to use, my first reading of Kharms proceeded in extreme slow motion. As I wondered over the meaning of each word, each sentence; as the meaning gradually emerged, my delight grew. Every sentence was, funnier than I could have guessed. A paragraph began: "Pushkin loved to throw rocks." Openings like that made me breathless to find out what would come next. The well-known difficulty of taking humor from one language into another has a lesser-known correlate: when, as sometimes happens, the translation succeeds, the joke can seem even funnier than it was to begin with. As I translated, I thought Kharms the funniest writer I had ever read.
His photograph facing the title page only confirmed this. At first glance he appeared crazy or fierce, but on closer inspection I could see the weirdness of a deeply funny guy. I wanted to know all I could about him. My teacher told me that he was a founding member of an artistic movement called OBERIU that the name came from the first letters of the Russian words for Association for Real Art, that he and other members of the group fell into disfavor and were killed, that when she was little she knew him as the author of poems and stories for children. We read some of his writing for children, work as blithe and whimsical and heedless as the stories in GTAPYXA were dark. In Russia's Lost Literature of the Absurd, a selection edited and translated by George Gibian (1971), I learned that Kharms was born Daniil Ivanovich Yuvachev in Petersburg in 1905; that his father, an intellectual and revolutionary, had been imprisoned and exiled to Siberia; that with his father he shared an interest in stories of fantasy; that he suffered from melancholy; that he admired Gogol, Knut Hamsun and Bach. A colleague said of him, "Kharms is art." Much of his work consisted of public readings, pranks, performances and daring gestures. With the Bolsheviks in power and the nobility vanished or in prison, Kharms assumed the guise of an aristocrat, complete with false mustache and a briefcase containing his own personal silver drinking cups. To attract people to a reading performance of the OBERIU group, Kharms strolled on a fifth-floor ledge in Saint Petersburg smoking a pipe and loudly announcing the event to passersby.
In short, he was a cool guy, too funny for communism, or at any rate for Stalin's version of it. After the successful production of his play, Elizabeth Bam, a comedy about a woman who is waiting to be arrested and killed, the press attacked the OBERIU, later accusing them of "reactionary jugglerism" and "nonsense poetry . . . against the dictatorship of the proletariat." Police arrest d him on the street in 1941; when his wife went to take him a package at the prison hospital in February, 1942, she was told that he had died two days before. Fourteen years after his death he was officially "rehabilitated." Bibliographies listed him only as an author of children's books. More recently, the larger outline of his work has begun to emerge; perhaps soon there will be a complete collection by which we can get to know him better. So far I have only scratched the surface on Kharms. 

-Ian Frazier

Trong số hàng triệu con người bị Stalin sát hại, có một nhà văn tức cười nhất, uyên nguyên nhất, của thế kỷ: Daniil Kharms. Sau khi ông chết ở trong tù, vào năm 1942, khi 37 tuổi, tên và tác phẩm của ông hầu như biến mất, và chỉ còn sống dưới dạng chép tay, lưu truyền giữa những nhóm nhỏ, ở một nơi có tên là Liên Bang Xô Viết.
Thực tình là, không có một độc giả Anh ngữ nào biết về ông. Tôi (Ian Frazier) cũng vậy, cho tới khi đi Nga, trở về, đọc những cuốn sách về nó, và cố gắng học tiếng Nga. Cô giáo của tôi, một người đàn bà trẻ chỉ ở Mỹ được vài tháng, đã ra bài làm ở nhà cho tôi như sau: hãy dịch một đoản văn của Daniil Kharms ra tiếng Anh. Đoản văn "Những mẩu chuyện từ Cuộc Đời Puskhin", (Anecdotes from the Life of Puskhin) là ở trong CTAPYXA (Bà Già), một tuyển tập nhỏ tác phẩm của Kharms, đã được xuất bản ở Moscow vào năm 1991. Tiếng Nga, hai cuốn từ điển, và một cuốn sách văn phạm, tất cả đều quá mới, lần đọc Kharms đầu tiên của tôi thật là chậm như sên. Cùng với sự mầy mò từng từ, từng câu, niềm hân hoan của tôi gia tăng, khi ý nghĩa của chúng lộ dần ra. Mỗi câu là một tức cười, hơn cả dự đoán của tôi về nó. Một đoạn văn bắt đầu như thế này: "Puskhin mê ném đá". Những mở đầu như vậy làm cho tôi nghẹt thở: làm sao đoán ra nổi cái gì sẽ tới liền sau đó.
Giữ được chất tiếu lâm, khi chuyển dịch ngôn ngữ, là một điều khó khăn vô cùng, ai nấy đều biết. Nhưng có một hệ quả, ít được biết: đôi khi, trong tiến trình dịch thuật, câu chuyện có vẻ tếu hơn là lúc thoạt đầu chúng ta nghĩ về nó. Trong khi dịch, tôi nghĩ Kharms là một nhà văn tức cười nhất mà tôi đã từng đọc.
Ian Frazier, qua cuốn Văn Chương Phi Lý Đã Mất của Nga (Russia’s Lost Literature of the Absurd), được biết, Kharms ra đời với tên Daniil Ivanovich Yuvachev, tại Petersburg vào năm 1905. Cha ông, một nhà trí thức cách mạng bị cầm tù và đầy đi Siberia. Ông thừa hưởng từ người cha, đam mê chuyện kỳ quái. Ông đau khổ vì "buồn" (that he suffered from melancholy). Mê Gogol, Knut Hamsun và Bach. Một bạn đồng học nói về ông: "Kharms là nghệ thuật" (Kharms is art). Cùng với sự lên ngôi của "nhà vô sản", và sự vào tù của "nhà quí tộc", Kharms cảm thấy thích thú trong bộ dạng một nhà quí phái, cộng thêm hàng ria mép giả thỉnh thoảng lại nhinh nhích, hinh hỉnh, cộng thêm chiếc cặp da kè kè bên mình, trong là những… chiếc ly uống rượu bằng bạc! Để lôi kéo khán thính giả cho một buổi trình diễn kịch của nhóm OBERIU, ông di dạo ở chót vót phía bên trên thành phố Saint Petersburg, miệng ngậm ống vố, và la lớn, thông báo cho những bộ hành qua lại phía bên dưới, về "biến cố quan trọng" kể trên!
Nói tóm lại, một gã vui nhộn, quá vui nhộn đối với chủ nghĩa Cộng Sản. Đối với bất cứ một ấn bản nào của Stalin, về chủ nghĩa Cộng Sản. Sau thành công của vở kịch "Elizabeth Bam", một hài kịch về một người đàn bà chờ… "được bắt và được giết", báo chí nhà nước kết án nhóm kịch của ông là… "trò múa may phản động, thơ ca vô nghĩa… chống lại nền chuyên chính vô sản". Ông bị bắt ở ngay trên đường phố, vào năm 1941. Khi vợ ông đi thăm nuôi, vào năm 1942, bà được thông báo, ông chết hai ngày trước đó. Mười bốn năm sau khi mất, tên tuổi của ông được phục hồi. Những nhà chuyên viết tiểu sử xếp ông vào danh sách: viết chuyện cho nhi đồng.

Ian Frazier

*


Chân Dung Nga

 Trong một kỳ Tin Văn, Jennifer có nhắc tới bức hình nhà văn Nga Nabokov khi còn là một cậu con nít nhà giầu, ngồi vắt vẻo trên ghế cao, chân mang vớ dài, tay mở bộ sưu tập bướm. Hai nỗi đam mê lớn của ông đã có ở trong bức hình: mê bướm, và mê làm… phù thuỷ, cầm cây "viết thần", ra lệnh : hãy nói đi, hồi ức (speak, memory).
Bức hình nói trên, là ở trong tạp chí Điểm Sách Paris (The Paris Review), số Mùa Đông, 1995. Còn hình một vài nhà văn Nga khác. Đây là những hình thật đặc biệt; có những bức lấy ra từ hồ sơ "mật", hoặc "nghe đồn", được giấu ở đáy một ống thông hơi thang máy. Đặc biệt hơn nữa, mỗi bức kèm theo một bài viết, do những tác giả đã từng có một mối thân quen đặc biệt với người trong hình, hoặc do chính người phát giác ra bức hình (như hình Andreyev, Babel, và Kharms).
Jennifer xin cống hiến bạn đọc bài viết của Ian Frazier (nhà văn Mỹ, thường viết văn "u mặc", humor, và "không-giả tưởng", non-fiction, hiện sống ở Missoula, Montana), về bức hình nhà văn
Trong số hàng triệu con người bị Stalin sát hại, có một nhà văn tức cười nhất, uyên nguyên nhất, của thế kỷ: Daniil Kharms. Sau khi ông chết ở trong tù, vào năm 1942, khi 37 tuổi, tên và tác phẩm của ông hầu như biến mất, và chỉ còn sống dưới dạng chép tay, lưu truyền giữa những nhóm nhỏ, ở một nơi có tên là Liên Bang Xô Viết.
Thực tình là, không có một độc giả Anh ngữ nào biết về ông. Tôi (Ian Frazier) cũng vậy, cho tới khi đi Nga, trở về, đọc những cuốn sách về nó, và cố gắng học tiếng Nga. Cô giáo của tôi, một người đàn bà trẻ chỉ ở Mỹ được vài tháng, đã ra bài làm ở nhà cho tôi như sau: hãy dịch một đoản văn của Daniil Kharms ra tiếng Anh. Đoản văn "Những mẩu chuyện từ Cuộc Đời Puskhin", (Anecdotes from the Life of Puskhin) là ở trong CTAPYXA (Bà Già), một tuyển tập nhỏ tác phẩm của Kharms, đã được xuất bản ở Moscow vào năm 1991. Tiếng Nga, hai cuốn từ điển, và một cuốn sách văn phạm, tất cả đều quá mới, lần đọc Kharms đầu tiên của tôi thật là chậm như sên. Cùng với sự mầy mò từng từ, từng câu, niềm hân hoan của tôi gia tăng, khi ý nghĩa của chúng lộ dần ra. Mỗi câu là một tức cười, hơn cả dự đoán của tôi về nó. Một đoạn văn bắt đầu như thế này: "Puskhin mê ném đá". Những mở đầu như vậy làm cho tôi nghẹt thở: làm sao đoán ra nổi cái gì sẽ tới liền sau đó.
Giữ được chất tiếu lâm, khi chuyển dịch ngôn ngữ, là một điều khó khăn vô cùng, ai nấy đều biết. Nhưng có một hệ quả, ít được biết: đôi khi, trong tiến trình dịch thuật, câu chuyện có vẻ tếu hơn là lúc thoạt đầu chúng ta nghĩ về nó. Trong khi dịch, tôi nghĩ Kharms là một nhà văn tức cười nhất mà tôi đã từng đọc.
Ian Frazier, qua cuốn Văn Chương Phi Lý Đã Mất của Nga (Russia’s Lost Literature of the Absurd), được biết, Kharms ra đời với tên Daniil Ivanovich Yuvachev, tại Petersburg vào năm 1905. Cha ông, một nhà trí thức cách mạng bị cầm tù và đầy đi Siberia. Ông thừa hưởng từ người cha, đam mê chuyện kỳ quái. Ông đau khổ vì "buồn" (that he suffered from melancholy). Mê Gogol, Knut Hamsun và Bach. Một bạn đồng học nói về ông: "Kharms là nghệ thuật" (Kharms is art). Cùng với sự lên ngôi của "nhà vô sản", và sự vào tù của "nhà quí tộc", Kharms cảm thấy thích thú trong bộ dạng một nhà quí phái, cộng thêm hàng ria mép giả thỉnh thoảng lại nhinh nhích, hinh hỉnh, cộng thêm chiếc cặp da kè kè bên mình, trong là những… chiếc ly uống rượu bằng bạc! Để lôi kéo khán thính giả cho một buổi trình diễn kịch của nhóm OBERIU, ông di dạo ở chót vót phía bên trên thành phố Saint Petersburg, miệng ngậm ống vố, và la lớn, thông báo cho những bộ hành qua lại phía bên dưới, về "biến cố quan trọng" kể trên!
Nói tóm lại, một gã vui nhộn, quá vui nhộn đối với chủ nghĩa Cộng Sản. Đối với bất cứ một ấn bản nào của Stalin, về chủ nghĩa Cộng Sản. Sau thành công của vở kịch "Elizabeth Bam", một hài kịch về một người đàn bà chờ… "được bắt và được giết", báo chí nhà nước kết án nhóm kịch của ông là… "trò múa may phản động, thơ ca vô nghĩa… chống lại nền chuyên chính vô sản". Ông bị bắt ở ngay trên đường phố, vào năm 1941. Khi vợ ông đi thăm nuôi, vào năm 1942, bà được thông báo, ông chết hai ngày trước đó. Mười bốn năm sau khi mất, tên tuổi của ông được phục hồi. Những nhà chuyên viết tiểu sử xếp ông vào danh sách: viết chuyện cho nhi đồng.